New Healthcare Integration Challenges for ISV’s

With new regulation comes new opportunity. New healthcare requirements around the digitization of health information has caused a wide variety of start-ups and services to surface. Innovation is great, but there are very few standards being adhered to, causing a lot of headaches for ISV’s who are working with new customers to implement their systems.

If a hospital, physician, or clinical lab would like to start using a new product or service, that application needs to be able to communicate with older systems that may not be ready for retirement. Who will be responsible for ensuring that the two systems can interface to each other? How much will this cost and what impact will it have on deployment schedules? This typically falls on the vendor and a solutions specialist needs to be brought in.

Take for example a PMS system at a physician practice that now needs to communicate with a scheduling system that resides in a data-center off-site. The physician PMS will need to exchanges HL7 SIU messages with the scheduling system securely, meeting HIPAA requirements for health information exchange.

In order for this to happen, a secure connection between the two endpoints needs to be established, application interfaces need to be built, ports to the firewall need to be opened, and eventually a mechanism for ensuring each endpoint is authenticated must be implemented (See Wikipedia Article under Security Rule). What seemed to be a simple roll-out of a new system now requires professional services, network changes, and protocol conversion if there is a different transport protocol in use.

These integrations and road blocks can increase sales cycles and implementation times, making it harder to sell while decreasing margins for the ISV. Not to mention, the burden this may place on the customer.

Once an integration occurs, it is also necessary to monitor and maintain the network, which requires IT resources that may not have previously existed or may not have the bandwidth to support an increasing number of integration points.

As part of your integration strategy, it is important to evaluate a build vs. buy strategy:

– What will be the cost impact of rolling a VPN and application interface for each endpoint?

– What will be the cost of managing and maintaining that network?

– Who will bear the cost?

– What impact will this have on implementation times and sales cycles?

– As compliance regulations change, how will this impact your solution and margins?

Healthcare interoperability is an extremely important part of HIPAA regulations and a lot of health IT professionals will be focused on it, but as an ISV, connectivity may not be a part of your core offering, making it a distraction instead of an opportunity. If the numbers do not add up, it may make sense to use an application integration service as part of your value proposition to the customer, making implementation smoother, and decreasing network costs.



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