Healthcare Integration & Interoperability — Part 2

Yesterday we briefly covered what healthcare integration and interoperability is and what it means to the healthcare industry. In today’s segment, we will be discussing some of the file protocols that are used in conjunction with continuity of care and interoperability.

The file protocols that we will focus on today are some of the more popular formats: HL7, DICOM, CCD & CCR.

HL7 application interface

HL7 File Protocol

Much like the blood cell in the human system, HL7 messages are the lifeblood of healthcare data exchange. Established in 1987, Health Level 7 (HL7) is a non-profit organization who’s mission is to “[provide] standards for interoperability that improve care delivery, optimize work flow, reduce ambiguity and enhance knowledge transfer among all of our stakeholders, including healthcare providers, government agencies, the vendor community, fellow SDOs and patients.”

In more simple terms, HL7 is a file protocol through which care providers leverage a standard for sharing patient data. HL7 messages are broken into specific types that relate to a specific event within a patient record, also known as a trigger event:

  • ACK — General acknowledgment
  • ADT — Admit discharge transfer
  • BAR — Add/change billing account
  • DFT — Detailed financial transaction
  • MDM — Medical document management
  • MFN — Master files notification
  • ORM — Order (pharmacy/treatment)
  • ORU — Observation result (Unsolicited)
  • QRY — Query, original mode
  • RAS — Pharmacy/treatment administration
  • RDE — Pharmacy/treatment encoded order
  • RGV — Pharmacy/treatment give
  • SIU — Scheduling information unsolicited

Each on of these trigger events is created by a hospital system and will need to be shared not just across internal systems, but also with hospitals, HIEs, physician groups, clinical labs, etc. that may reside outside of a healthcare providers network. Not each message type is relevant to all applications and many hospitals that maintain dozens of systems will leverage HL7 routing engines to deliver messages to the appropriate destination.

While the HL7 message protocol is a standard widely adopted healthcare providers, it is sometimes seen as Stephane Vigot of Caristix puts it, as a “non-standard standard”. What Mr. Vigot is saying is that even though the protocol specifies syntax and message headers for identifying pertinent information, different systems may use different templates. Take patient “sex” for example: one hospital may register a patient as either male or female and another may have up to 6 attributes relating to the patient’s sex. As a result, when systems are integrated, HL7 messages need to be normalized so that the systems know where to look for the information.

Version 2.x vs Version 3

Probably the most important thing to know about HL7 version 2.x vs. version 3 is that the latter has not been embraced by the healthcare industry yet. Version 2.x is a textual, non-XML based file format that uses delimiters to separate information. Version 3 on the other hand is an XML based file format.

DICOM

DICOM stands for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine. Like HL7, DICOM is a file format for exchanging patient data, but is used in conjunction with systems that exchange medical images. DICOM messages are the file protocol of choice for PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication Systems). Value Representations (VR) of a DICOM message.

Continuous Care Document (CCD) & Continuous Care Record (CCR)

These two documents perform very similar functions, and are considered summary documents. Both CCD and CCR are XML based documents and provide a summary of a patients healthcare history. Included in a CCD or CCR document is a human readable section that covers the patients care history as well as pertinent patient information such as demographics, insurance information, and administrative data.

The major difference between the two revolves around how closely one is tied to HL7 standards than the other and how much easier one fits into the current workflow of a particular health IT system. While some see CCD and CCR as competing standards, Vince Kuraitus of e-CareManagement argues that “the CCD and CCR standards are more complementary than competitive.” The basis of his opinion revolves around the “the right tool for the job” metaphor and HIEs adoption of CCD doesn’t say much.

Summary

Integration and interoperability need file protocol standards and as the healthcare IT industry keeps evolving, many of the ambiguities of the current standards will eventually (hopefully) be normalized and conformity will prevail. In the meantime, HL7 2.x, DICOM, CCD/CCR are here to stay and will continue to be the lifeblood of integration and connectivity.

Part 1 | Part 3



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